All the History

Manchester
I grew up astounded at how old the Declaration of Independence and the Liberty Bell were. Then, I came to England. The history of the U.K. extends hundreds and hundreds of years before the States' — and here, it's still no big deal for streets to have shops built in the 1500s. (OK, maybe the Tesco Express hasn't been there for that long, but the infrastructure has.) Last week, I spent a lot of time learning about different aspects of the country's history. It began with a trip to the People's History Museum, which documents the history of, well, the people in the U.K. Instead of going chronologically, or by exhibits, the museum's content was organized by color and theme; for example, there was a color for peace and prosperity,…
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Structures of Stone

Manchester
Ever since I got here, I've been amazed at the architecture and general grandeur of the buildings. In the U.S., historical buildings are a novelty; here, most city buildings have been around much longer than I have. The weekend before this past one, I took two day trips with the International Society here to places with lots of history. I spent Saturday in Oxford, home of the famed university. Although I had heard about its beauty and prestige, I didn't realize exactly how much history occurred here. For example, the building below? Lewis Carroll studied and taught here — telling the real-life Alice his stories of Wonderland in the adjacent garden — and the dining hall was replicated for the "Harry Potter" movie series. Christ Church College, Oxford Our tour…
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Great Scot!

Manchester
I've officially settled in. I can find my way around campus without having to stop and look at a map. I've gotten accustomed to only hearing British accents and seeing "fire exit" signs on every door. I know which days I'll make breakfast, which days I'll work out and which days are completely packed. I know to tell people which "modules" I'm in and have started swapping "thanks" for "cheers." I've chosen my grocery store (Tesco all the way). So now that I'm comfortable in my surroundings, it's only fitting I start exploring elsewhere. I took my first trip out of Manchester two weekends ago, when some fellow exchange students (including some from Mizzou) and I went to Scotland. I had no idea what to expect. One of my good…
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Being a Tourist in Your City

Manchester
One of the major appeals of studying abroad in Europe is, of course, that you can very easily travel the continent and see all of those places you've seen in every movie involving travel: the Eiffel Tower, Big Ben, the remains of the Berlin Wall. But, as a dear friend advised me before I left, it's equally as important to explore your own city and see what's beyond your campus — to give yourself a reason to call it home. And that's exactly what I've been doing this week. However, I did start my exploring on campus by visiting the Manchester Museum. I was expecting a modest-sized museum, such as the ones we have at MU, but was pleasantly surprised at its selection. I'm a huge fan of ancient Egypt…
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A Breath of Fresh (Academic) Air

Manchester
I've never known college without a media outlet — I started writing for The Maneater the week after I graduated from high school, and I've been working for various media outlets ever since. I also never knew high school without a literary magazine or yearbook. Hell, I barely knew middle school without a literary magazine, newspaper or yearbook. (I didn't consider journalism as a career choice until junior year, though. Go figure.) That's why the program I'm doing this semester was, at first, a bit alarming. In a country where courses (in the U.S., majors) are highly specialized, I'd be taking modules (classes) that, well, weren't in my area of study. I'd have the opportunity to learn things I knew nothing about, that were unlike anything I have or will…
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